This 1899 Victorian Mansion overflows with history and romantic ambiance of the Queen Anne and Revival eras: for sale


This 1899 Victorian Mansion overflows with history and romantic ambiance of the Queen Anne and Revival eras

New Harmony, Indiana, United States of America

NEGOTIABLE

790 000 USD

Agent: Cliff Jacobs - Managing Principal Estate Agent & CEO (Nat.Dpl.Hotel Man (UJ). M.P.R.E.)
Agent Cellphone: +27 (0) 84 413 1071 / +27 (0) 61 716 6951
Agent Office Number: +27 (0) 21 554 0283
Agent Email Address: cliff@exquisitehotelconsultants.com
Type: Bed and Breakfast
Bedrooms: 8
Bathrooms: 8
Showers: 8
Parking: 10
Yield: Not Disclosed


About New Harmony

A place of renewal.

New Harmony was established in the early 19th century as part of an effort to create Utopian communities.  Its rich 200+ year history includes some of the most interesting individuals of the last two centuries.  Lined in trees, filled with flowers, replete with cultural touchstones, this unique idyllic locale soothes the soul, thrills the eye, and warms the heart.  Some refer to it as enchanted.  Others call it Utopia.  New Harmony is an experience you won't soon forget.

It is a historic town on the Wabash River in Harmony TownshipPosey CountyIndiana. It lies 15 miles (24 km) north of Mount Vernon, the county seat, and is part of the Evansville metropolitan area. The town's population was 789 at the 2010 census.

Established by the Harmony Society in 1814 under the leadership of George Rapp, the town was originally known as Harmony (also called Harmonie, or New Harmony). In its early years the 20,000-acre (8,100 ha) settlement was the home of Lutherans who had separated from the official church in the Duchy of Württemberg and immigrated to the United States. The Harmonists built a new town in the wilderness, but in 1824 they decided to sell their property and return to Pennsylvania.  Robert Owen, a Welsh industrialist and social reformer, purchased the town in 1825 with the intention of creating a new utopian community and renamed it New Harmony. The Owenite social experiment failed two years after it began.

New Harmony changed American education and scientific research. Town residents established the first public library, a civic drama club, and a public school system open to men and women. Its prominent citizens included Owen's sons: Robert Dale Owen, an Indiana congressman and social reformer who sponsored legislation to create the Smithsonian InstitutionDavid Dale Owen, a noted state and federal geologist; William Owen, a New Harmony businessman; and Richard Owen, Indiana state geologist, Indiana University professor, and first president of Purdue University. The town also served as the second headquarters of the U.S. Geological Survey. Numerous scientists and educators contributed to New Harmony's intellectual community, including William MaclureMarie Louise Duclos FretageotThomas SayCharles-Alexandre LesueurJoseph NeefFrances Wright, and others.

Many of the town's old Harmonist buildings have been restored. These structures, along with others related to the Owenite community, are included in the New Harmony Historic District. Contemporary additions to the town include the Roofless Church and Atheneum. The New Harmony State Memorial is located south of town on State Road 69 in Harmonie State Park.

History

The town of Harmony was founded by the Harmony Society in 1814 under the leadership of German immigrant George Rapp (born Johann Georg Rapp). It was the second of three towns built by the pietistcommunal religious group, known as Harmonists, Harmonites, or Rappites. The Harmonists settled in the Indiana Territory after leaving Harmony, Pennsylvania, where westward expansion, the area's rising population, jealous neighbors, and the increasing cost of land threatened the Society's desire for isolation.

In April 1814 Anna Mayrisch, John L. Baker, and Ludwick Shirver (Ludwig Schreiber) traveled west in search of a new location for their congregation, one that would have fertile soil and access to a navigable waterway. By May 10 the men had found suitable land along the Wabash River in the Indiana Territory and made an initial purchase of approximately 7,000 acres (28 km2). Rapp wrote on May 10, "The place is 25 miles from the Ohio mouth of the Wabash, and 12 miles from where the Ohio makes its curve first before the mouth. The town will be located about 1/4 mile from the river above on the channel on a plane as level as the floor of a room, perhaps a good quarter mile from the hill which lies suitable for a vineyard."Although Rapp expressed concern that the town's location lacked a waterworks, the area provided an opportunity for expansion and access to markets through the nearby rivers, causing him to remark, "In short, the place has all the advantages which one could wish, if a steam engine meanwhile supplies what is lacking."

The first Harmonists left Pennsylvania in June 1814 and traveled by flatboat to their new land in the Indiana Territory. In May 1815 the last of the Harmonists who had remained behind until the sale of their town in Pennsylvania was completed departed for their new town along the Wabash River. Frederick Reichert Rapp, George Rapp's adopted son, drew up the town plan for their new village at Harmony, Indiana, which surveyors laid out on August 8, 1814. By 1816, the same year that Indiana became a state, the Harmonists had acquired 20,000 acres (81 km2) of land, built 160 homes and other buildings, and cleared 2,000 acres (8.1 km2) for their new town. The settlement also began to attract new arrivals, including emigrants from Germany such as members of Rapp's congregation from Württemberg, many of whom expected the Harmonists to pay for their passage to America.[16] However, the new arrivals "were more of a liability than an asset".[17] On March 20, 1819, Rapp commented, "It is astonishing how much trouble the people who have arrived here have made, for they have no morals and do not know what it means to live a moral and well-mannered life, not to speak of true Christianity, of denying the world or yourself."

Visitors to Harmony commented on the commercial and industrial work being done in this religious settlement along the Wabash River. "It seemed as though I found myself in the midst of Germany," noted one visitor. In 1819 the town had a steam-operated wool carding and spinning factory, a horse-drawn and human-powered threshing machine, a brewery, distillery, vineyards, and a winery. The property included an orderly town, "laid out in a square", with a church, school, store, dwellings for residents, and streets to create "the most beautiful city of western America, because everything is built in the most perfect symmetry". Other visitors were not as impressed: "hard labor & coarse fare appears to be the lot of all except the family of Rapp, he lives in a large & handsome brick house while the rest inhabit small log cabins. How so numerous a population are kept quietly & tamely in absolute servitude it is hard to conceive—the women I believe do more labor in the field than the men, as large numbers of the latter are engaged in different branches of manufactures." Although they were not paid for their work, the 1820 manufacturer's census reported that 75 men, 12 women, and 30 children were employed, in the Society's tanneries, saw and grain mills, and woolen and cotton mills. Manufactured goods included cotton, flannel, and wool cloth, yarn, knit goods, tin ware, rope, beer, peach brandy, whiskey, wine, wagons, carts, plows, flour, beef, pork, butter, leather, and leather goods.

The Harmonist community continued to thrive during the 1820s, but correspondence from March 6, 1824, between Rapp and his adopted son, Frederick, indicates that the Harmonists planned to sell their Indiana property and were already looking for a new location. In May, a decade after their arrival in Indiana, the Harmonists purchased land along the Ohio River eighteen miles from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and were making arrangements to advertise the sale of their property in Indiana. The move, although it was made primarily for religious reasons, would provide the Harmonists with easier access to eastern markets and a place where they could live more peacefully with others who shared their German language and culture. On May 24, 1824, a group of Harmonists boarded a steamboat and departed Indiana, bound for Pennsylvania, where they founded the community of Economy, the present-day town of Ambridge. In May 1825 the last Harmonists left Indiana after the sale of their 20,000 acres (81 km2) of property, which included the land and buildings, to Robert Owen for $150,000.Owen hoped to establish a new community on the Indiana frontier, one that would serve as a model community for communal living and social reform.

Indiana

Indiana is a U.S. state in the Midwestern United States. It is the 38th-largest by area and the 17th-most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis. Indiana was admitted to the United States as the 19th state on December 11, 1816. It is bordered by Lake Michigan to the northwest, Michigan to the north, Ohio to the east, the Ohio River and Kentucky to the south and southeast, and the Wabash River and Illinois to the west.

Various indigenous peoples inhabited what would become Indiana for thousands of years, some of whom the U.S. government expelled between 1800 and 1836. Indiana received its name because the state was largely possessed by native tribes even after it was granted statehood. Since then, settlement patterns in Indiana have reflected regional cultural segmentation present in the Eastern United States; the state's northernmost tier was settled primarily by people from New England and New York, Central Indiana by migrants from the Mid-Atlantic states and adjacent Ohio, and Southern Indiana by settlers from the Upland South, particularly Kentucky and Tennessee.

Indiana has a diverse economy with a gross state product of $352.62 billion in 2021.[8] It has several metropolitan areas with populations greater than 100,000 and a number of smaller cities and towns. Indiana is home to professional sports teams, including the NFL's Indianapolis Colts and the NBA's Indiana Pacers. The state also hosts several notable competitive events, such as the Indianapolis 500, held at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Etymology

Indiana's name means "Land of the Indians", or simply "Indian Land". It also stems from Indiana's territorial history. On May 7, 1800, the United States Congress passed legislation to divide the Northwest Territory into two areas and named the western section the Indiana Territory. In 1816, when Congress passed an Enabling Act to begin the process of establishing statehood for Indiana, a part of this territorial land became the geographic area for the new state.

Formal use of the word Indiana dates from 1768, when a Philadelphia-based trading company gave its land claim in present-day West Virginia the name "Indiana" in honor of its previous owners, the Iroquois. Later, ownership of the claim was transferred to the Indiana Land Company, the first recorded use of the word Indiana. But the Virginia colony argued that it was the rightful owner of the land because it fell within its geographic boundaries. The U.S. Supreme Court denied the land company's right to the claim in 1798.

A native or resident of Indiana is known as a Hoosier. The etymology of this word is disputed, but the leading theory, advanced by the Indiana Historical Bureau and the Indiana Historical Society, has its origin in Virginia, the Carolinas, and Tennessee (the Upland South) as a term for a backwoodsman, a rough countryman, or a country bumpkin.

Indigenous inhabitants

The first inhabitants in what is now Indiana were the Paleo-Indians, who arrived about 8000 BC after the melting of the glaciers at the end of the Ice Age. Divided into small groups, the Paleo-Indians were nomads who hunted large game such as mastodons. They created stone tools made out of chert by chipping, knapping and flaking.

The Archaic period, which began between 5000 and 4000 BC, covered the next phase of indigenous culture. The people developed new tools as well as techniques to cook food, an important step in civilization. These new tools included different types of spear points and knives, with various forms of notches. They made ground-stone tools such as stone axes, woodworking tools and grinding stones. During the latter part of the period, they built earthwork mounds and middens, which showed settlements were becoming more permanent. The Archaic period ended at about 1500 BC, although some Archaic people lived until 700 BC.

The Woodland period began around 1500 BC when new cultural attributes appeared. The people created ceramics and pottery and extended their cultivation of plants. An early Woodland period group named the Adena people had elegant burial rituals, featuring log tombs beneath earth mounds. In the middle of the Woodland period, the Hopewell people began to develop long-range trade of goods. Nearing the end of the stage, the people developed highly productive cultivation and adaptation of agriculture, growing such crops as corn and squash. The Woodland period ended around 1000 AD.

The Mississippian culture emerged, lasting from 1000 AD until the 15th century, shortly before the arrival of Europeans. During this stage, the people created large urban settlements designed according to their cosmology, with large mounds and plazas defining ceremonial and public spaces. The concentrated settlements depended on the agricultural surpluses. One such complex was the Angel Mounds. They had large public areas such as plazas and platform mounds, where leaders lived or conducted rituals. Mississippian civilization collapsed in Indiana during the mid-15th century for reasons that remain unclear.

The historic Native American tribes in the area at the time of European encounter spoke different languages of the Algonquian family. They included the ShawneeMiami, and Illini. Refugee tribes from eastern regions, including the Delaware who settled in the White and Whitewater River Valleys, later joined them.

 





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Key features

About Us

When you book a stay at this Bed & Breakfast, you can choose from our selection of individual rooms with private bathrooms, the Loft Suite, the two-bedroom Gallery Suite, or you can rent the entire house.   Choose the style, the price point, and the amenities that suit your needs and stylistic preferences.

Immerse yourself in the glorious craftsmanship of the late Victorian era while enjoying the comforts of today at the beautifully restored Queen Anne Victorian mansion built in 1899.  With stunning Classic Revival and Romanesque design elements and Morris design wallpaper procured from Bradbury & Bradbury, the home is under new ownership and is now open as a bed and breakfast inn.

The B&B offers eight different accommodation choices. There are five spectacular Victorian bedrooms, each with an ensuite.  The spacious Loft Suite with its 14 foot ceilings is flush with natural light, views over the park, and wonderful spaces to relax and recharge.  A kitchenette and washer and dryer are also found in the Loft Suite, along with a 60" television and a dining table for two.  The incredibly roomy Gallery Suite features two bedrooms, one queen and two twins, and 1 1/2 bathrooms, along with a large living room, dining room, and an efficiency kitchen.  In the Gallery Suite, ground level windows invite abundant natural lighting and offer views of the manicured surrounding grounds, while inside a large private collection of photographs capture the essence of New Harmony. 

This magnificent property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  And now, you have the opportunity to reserve a single room or suite -- or rent the entire house and garden.

While you are at the B&B, relax and enjoy the exquisite English garden, featuring a grand metal scrollwork gazebo. The garden is perfectly suited for small weddings, garden parties, or simply enjoying a beverage while listening to birdsong and watching butterflies in the spring and summer months.

Located two blocks from the banks of the Wabash River, this stunningly gorgeous historic mansion serves distinguished travelers and those seeking a unique or romantic getaway or a place to hold a special event.

The B&B is located an easy one block walk to shops, galleries, restaurants, live performances and more. Also, just a few short blocks away, is the Atheneum Visitor Center where guests can find information on local attractions and events and rent golf carts or bicycles to get around in the village.

The peaceful and picturesque village of New Harmony is home to countless artists, writers and poets and reflects the cultural and intellectual interests of its founders through experiences and special events. Visitors will enjoy renewing their spirit by walking the labyrinths and strolling through the many public gardens and historic spaces throughout the town.

Accommodation

The Loft Suite

  • 2 Guests
  • 1 Bathroom
  • 1 Bedroom
  • 1 Kitchen
  • 1 King bed

Room Amenities

Kitchen & dining

  • Coffee machine, Microwave, Refrigerator and Toaster

Entertainment

  • DVD-Player and TV (Antenna)

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning, Ceiling fans and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Clothes dryer, Iron & Board, Washing machine, Hair dryer and Shower

President Taft Room

  • 2 Guests
  • 1 Bathroom
  • 1 Bedroom
  • 1 King bed

Room Amenities

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning, Ceiling fans and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Hair dryer 

Prince Harry Room

  • 2 Guests
  • 1 Bathroom
  • 1 Bedroom
  • 1 Queen bed

Room Amenities

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Hair dryer

Princess Catherine Room

  • 2 Guests
  • 1 Bathroom
  • 1 Bedroom
  • 1 Room Balcony
  • 1 Queen bed

Room Amenities

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Hair dryer

Prince William Room

  • 2 Guests
  • 1 Bathroom
  • 1 Bedroom
  • 1 Queen bed

Room Amenities

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Hair dryer

Princess Diana Room

  • 2 Guests
  • 1 Bathroom
  • 1 Bedroom
  • 1 Queen bed

Room Amenities

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Hair dryer

Gallery Suite

  • 4 Guests
  • 2 Bathrooms
  • 2 Bedrooms
  • 1 Dining-Room
  • 1 Kitchen
  • 1 Living room
  • 1 Fold-away bed
  • 1 Queen bed
  • 2 Single beds

Room Amenities

Kitchen & dining

  • Coffee machine, Cooking utensils, Kitchen stove, Oven and Refrigerator

Entertainment

  • DVD-Player and TV (Cable)

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Iron & Board, Hair dryer and Shower

Whole House and Garden

  • 16 Guests
  • 8 Bathrooms
  • 8 Bedrooms
  • 2 Kitchens
  • 2 Double beds
  • 2 King beds
  • 3 Queen beds
  • 2 Single beds

Room Amenities

Kitchen & dining

  • Blender, Coffee machine, Cooking utensils, Dishwasher, Grill, Kitchen stove, Microwave, Oven, Refrigerator, Spices, Toaster and Water purifier

Entertainment

  • DVD-Player and TV (Cable)

Internet & office

  • Broadband Internet

Heating & cooling

  • Air conditioning and Central heating

Bathroom & laundry

  • Clothes dryer, Iron & Board, Washing machine and Hair dryer

About Your Stay

We want your stay at our B&BA to be relaxing, enchanting and memorable. 

Your visit will start with check-in between 3 and 5 p.m. (If you are unable to arrive during this time, please let us know and we will make alternate arrangements.) 

If you have a few minutes, let us show you around the property, including our beautiful gardens.

Your visit to New Harmony can be as active or restful as you want. We can offer you recommendations for places to explore, shop or eat dinner. 

Find something to read in our library. Engage in a challenging game from our large selection. Stay connected to the outside world through our fast, free Internet. You'll find coffee and water in the kitchen.

Each room or suite features a private bathroom.  In the Loft Suite and the Princess Diana Room there are both walk-in showers and separate tubs.  In the Prince Harry Room, there is a walk-in shower.  The other rooms have tubs that are also fitted with shower attachments. 

Breakfast

In the morning, breakfast will be served at 9 a.m. in the Dining Room. You'll enjoy fresh coffee from New Harmony's own Black Lodge Coffee Roasters, along with a delicious specially prepared breakfast to start off your day.

We ask that you please check out by 11 a.m. so we can prepare for our next visitors.

We so look forward to having you as our guests at our B&B!

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Cliff Jacobs (Nat Dpl Hotel Man (UJ). MPRE. GA Level 5 TEFL)

Managing Principal / CEO

Exquisite Hotel Consultants (Pty) Ltd

Mobile: +27 (0) 84 413 1071 / +27 (0) 61 716 6951

Landline: +27 (0) 21 554 0283

Emailcliff@exquisitehotelconsultants.com

Skype: cliff.jacobs

C/o Sybelstrasse 69

10629 Berlin

GERMANY

Terms and Conditions apply



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